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investment planning

What's Your Investing Personality?

Just as each of us is unique as a person, we also have a distinct investing personality. One isn't better or worse than the other, but understanding "who” you are as an investor is helpful, no matter your circumstances, or how much money you have to invest. While it's a complex matter that depends on various factors, exploring the questions below may give you some preliminary insight into your investing personality.

Questions. Questions. Questions.

It is increasingly difficult to ignore some of the trading action in the markets that is causing surprising moves in equity values while the underlying economy continues to struggle (refer to U.S. unemployment data, for example). This type of divergence has occurred in the past and at some point, the values reflected in the stock, bond and real estate markets are expected to closely reflect the underlying economy eventually.

Time-Tested Money Management Strategies

As we grow up, what we learn about money from our parents can significantly influence how we earn, save, and grow our wealth. Meaghan, an elementary school teacher, credits her mother for her healthy approach to finances today. "I was lucky to grow up understanding that I could control my financial future if I was smart about it." There's a lot to be learned from a generation that knew how to manage their finances and feel optimistic about the future. Consider these time-tested principles that you can use to enhance your relationship with money.

Does Buy and Hold Still Work?

As an investment strategy, "Buy and Hold" is just what it sounds like: you buy an investment and hold it for an extended period, riding out market fluctuations and selling when the price reaches your target. The underlying logic of this strategy is that investments tend to gain value over time. That long-term gain, along with compound interest, can work to increase your initial deposit and provide you with a valuable asset for your future.

The Difference Between Price and Profits

The recent market turmoil triggered by the COVID-19 virus (and its possible impact on economic activity) brings to mind some observations by legendary investor Warren Buffett. During his years of investing, he has famously stated that in the short-run (days, weeks, and months) the investment markets are a voting machine. People buy and sell investments based on price momentum, or their emotions regarding how comfortable they are with the price direction over a few days or weeks.

The Magic Wealth Ingredient

There is a legend about a successful financial advisor in Warren Buffett's stomping grounds of Omaha, Nebraska. It is reported that this advisor has learned the art of communicating the basics of wealth building with the local farmers. The advisor, who we will call Fred Smith, greets clients in his office with a window behind his desk that overlooks fields of blowing wheat and corn.

Buy Now, Pay Big Time Later

Brent and Darlene really enjoy their 'toys' and their lifestyle. In the last few years, they bought themselves a big screen TV, a stereo system, two expensive new vehicles, a ski boat and took a tropical vacation, mostly on credit. They also used their credit cards to pay for numerous restaurant meals, theatre tickets, hockey games and other expensive outside entertainment. It wasn't long before they were carrying a balance from month to month. The credit charges and payments quickly became a burden.

NIRP, ZIRP and You

In his early July testimony before Congress, US Federal Reserve Chairman Jay Powell. Mr. Powell stated that the Fed funds rate will be reduced, given lower than expected U.S. inflation. This follows on the heels of President Trump’s demands for lower interest rates to help support the economy and more specifically the US stock market. As anticipated, in late July the US Federal Reserve lowered interest rates for the first time in over ten years but at the same time signaled that there was no certainty that further rate cuts would occur during 2019 or beyond.

Law of Large Numbers

Over the next several years, governments in advanced countries will likely continue to struggle with mounting debt burdens and the associated rising costs of servicing that debt. It is also noteworthy to remember that total government debt continues to increase every year because of deficit spending.

So how does the Law of Large Numbers apply here? Simply put, at some point the whole debt situation could defy the ability of a government to control a national economy and the response to ever increasing debt burden costs. Here is a definition from Investopedia:

Looking at Investment Returns

A major Canadian financial institution ran an investment promotion earlier this year that promised attractive returns for GIC-type investors, who needed higher returns to generate income. While dealing with an advisor from this particular institution on another matter, the conversation turned to the details of their offer.

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